How to tie a scarf 13 ways

I don’t really accessorise that much.  I certainly didn’t in the past.

  • A pair of stud earrings (I’ve given up wearing really nice earring because I have a tendency to lose them. 2 pairs of diamond earrings lost – even having the metal detector out didn’t find the second pair lost at home somewhere)
  • Watch (or Fitbit* currently)
  • Handbag
  • Occasionally a hat if it’s really cold
  • Occasionally a necklace or bracelet if it’s a night out.

But the last few years I’ve started wearing scarfs or pashminas as scarfs.  I do find my neck gets too hot a lot of the time, but it’s nice to have a gorgeous scarf to finish off an outfit.  At work in particular, it can sometimes be cold in the mornings until it’s warmed up, so a scarf can be a handy warming addition as well.

There’s always those people who look really glamourous and effortless in their accessorising.  Sometimes I feel a scarf can take over, but I’ve got a few ways I wear them, and almost a full drawer full of them, so thought I’d share some ways to wear them.

One of my scarf collection

Different scarf options

Long line / narrow – usually a dressier scarf.  Perfect for dressing up a casual outfit.  I’ve got a couple of scarfs which are sequins or embroidered and they’re perfect for a night out when wearing black, to liven it up.

Long / wide – great for using as a pashmina or wrap if needed, and probably the most versatile.

Square – smaller, these are often bandana style cotton or silk.   Before wearing scarves was more fashionable, this type of silk scarf was probably seen as worn by the middle-upper classes, by posh middle aged women in the country.  Not anymore!

Triangle – usually a bandana, casual style, can use a square scarf for this shape.

12 ways to tie a scarf - Bubbablue and me

13 ways to tie a scarf

Most of these methods use a long wide scarf – these are all the ones readily available in most clothes stores or supermarkets.

The basic / European tie

This is the basic way I tie my scarves.  I was surprised to see it recently referred to as the European way to tie a scarf on an American website, but I suppose that does make sense given it’s the usual way over here.

Just take the scarf, fold it in half.  Doubled up, hold the looped end in one hand, the 2 ends in the other, put round the back of your neck, and put the 2 ends through the loop and adjust to fit.  You can have it as tight or loose as you want.

Cravat style

Similar to the basic tie, but make sure you hold the loop facing up and put the 2 end up through the loop.  Then hang the ends over the top like a cravat.

The tie

Avoid using a really narrow scarf for this otherwise it will look just like a man’s tie and a little odd.  Using a wider scarf will give a warmer feel and cosy, fuller look.

Tie like a man’s tie.  Put round the back of the neck with one end longer than the other hanging down your front.  Hold the shorter end, and wrap the longer end twice round the short end.  The wrapping end should end at the back of the short end, then bring the end up through the circle at the front of your neck from back through to front.  You can slot this end through the top part of the wrapped piece like a tie, or like a cravat just pop the end straight over the rest in front.

The Pretzel

Double up the scarf in the same way as above, but when you go to put the ends through the loop, only put one end through.  Then below the end you put through, twist the end of the loop and put the other loose end of the scarf through.    So called a pretzel because of the twist shape.  This one looks a bit smarter than the basic method, and sits a bit flatter.

The Hermes

Similar to the pretzel, this sits flatter which means it’s great under a coat.  Instead of putting the single ends through the loop, put both ends together through the loop and then the twisted loop.

The Twist

Double up the scarf and holding the loop in one hand, the ends in the other, twist the length of the scarf round and round.  Then put round your neck and put the ends through the loop.

The long scarf

Especially good with a long narrow scarf, especially if it’s embellished as you want to keep it simple.  I tend to just tie it as I would a big woolly scarf in winter.

Simply wrap once round your neck (or twice if it’s really long), and leave the ends loose falling down over each shoulder down your front

The Wraparound

Put the scarf around the back of your neck with the ends hanging down your front, one end longer than the other.  Take the longer end and wrap it once round your neck, leaving it quite a loose circle.  You should have 2 ends down your front that are a similar length.  Then take each end and wrap over and under the scarf round your neck from the back to the front until the ends meet.  You can then either just leave the ends loose, or tuck under.  I tend to tuck under but then rotate the scarf circle until the ends are at the back and hidden by my hair.

womens scarves

The Cowboy

For this, use a square scarf.

Fold in half to make a triangle.  Place the point of the triangle down, with the horizontal edge in line with your shoulders, ends held in both hands.  Just put each end round the back of your neck, then bring round to the front to either tie or leave loose.    If you’ve a really big scarf, you can drape round a couple of times and just rearrange to suit.

Bow tie

Wrap scarf round back of neck and tie in a bow at side of neck. You need a long scarf for this to get a good drop effect with the loose ends.

Infinity scarf

Take a long scarf, tie the ends together to make one big circular scarf.  Double it up to make 2 circles and place over your head with the knot at the back of your neck.  You can pull one loop longer than the other or have both the same size to make it fuller

The sarong

Take a large scarf, place behind your back centrally and bring each side under your arms and to the front.  Cross one of the top corners across your front (ie take the right hand side across your chest and up by your left shoulder), then repeat on the other side over the top of the first crossed piece of scarf.  Take the top 2 corners and tie them behind your head.  Great for an on the beach cover up.

The waistcoat

You’ll need a large wide (nearly square) scarf.  Tie 2 corners together, then tie the other 2 corners together.   Slip arms through 1 of the ties each, and you’ll have a loose waistcoat/jacket – handy for the beach or wearing a pashmina when you’ve got a bit cold, but don’t want to hold it on.

Do you wear scarves?  How do you wear them?

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13 thoughts on “How to tie a scarf 13 ways

  1. I’ve always got a scarf on in the winter months. I’ll put it on in the morning and that’s where it usually stays for the day! They’ve become part of my outfits!! I have so many – this was a great read. Thanks for sharing it 🙂 #ablogginggoodtime

  2. I think scarves are perfect for adding in some fun and warmth! I know that I just made a couple of videos to show some styles for wearing scarves!! And I’m doing a blog series next week!
    But before blogging, I didn’t wear them as much. I think it’s all just getting in the habit!!
    jodie
    #ablogginggoodtime

    1. Thanks Madeline. I have to admit I usually only do a couple of ways, but it’s handy to know what works with different tops because sometimes they don’t always lay right. I’ve pretty much had to shed my scarves now because I get too hot with them from this time of year. Thanks for stopping by

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